Hunter Grigg Musical Bio

Meet Hunter Grigg

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The last two years have been some of fast paced change, and intense self-exploration for Asheville Singer-Songwriter Hunter Grigg: as an artist, as a man, and as a human. It is within these veins that he strives to align himself, endlessly reaching to find his place in all three. “Like my dad always says, ‘you’re either growing or you’re dying.’ I never want to stop growing, in any capacity, but it’s often easy to miss sight of where you’re headed. Life sometimes decides for you.” Indeed it was in the midst of extensive touring in support of his debut EP with his father at his side that Grigg felt the full effects of this truth. In many ways, keeping busy with life on the road was the best way of maintaining progress and direction for the young musician. By ceaselessly playing to a staunch regional fan base, the blossoming twenty-something had ensured an audience ever hungry for the introspective and plaintive ballads he had gained such recognition for. However, with the necessity of live performance, he found himself somewhat trapped. “’This Cold and Fearsome Wild’ wasn’t just a body of work, it was a real, three-dimensional world that I was living in, and that I was trying to be rid of. The defining lessons and heartache of that record were preventing me from moving forward, and so for a time, I had to move aside.”

And so he did. In the quiet and contemplative embrace of the Appalachian Mountains, Grigg reconciled with the heavy lessons of his previous work which helped him find the peace he so avidly sought throughout his teens. “I felt stagnant and as was the case with my dad’s expression, that I was dying. One of the greatest truths I’ve found through it all is that failure is just as valuable a lesson as success. In many ways, the two are one, and you need a good dose of both every now and again. They’re medicines.” Yet it was not to his artistic detriment that Hunter Grigg stepped back from the darkness surrounding his work, but rather to its eager and excited revival. In fall 2016, he announced a new EP in the works, which would be followed by a regional 2017 tour in support. The aptly named follow up record “Something like an Altar” was produced by himself and longtime friend and former bandmate Blake Jones. In many ways, the EP is a response to the sorrow and sadness of “This Cold and Fearsome Wild.” In reality, it is a victory over a major component that dominated Grigg’s thoughts: doubt. “You can’t let your flaws bog you down, and you especially can’t concede to defeat. Not in thought or deed. Eventually, you have to learn to be okay with You. I address this theme in the new record in an attempt to make it concrete. I really hope people will like it.” With the past put to rest and a promising future, one can guarantee that Hunter Grigg will be working diligently to further his story, and seek to spread encouragement with his heartfelt, impassioned music. “Something like an Altar” will be released in April 2017.